Dave Duree

Born on Halloween in 1941 in Indianapolis, Indiana just months before Pearl Harbor. His father worked at RCA where he built radios for planes.

Transcription

JIM MAYOLA: We are in the Express Studio at the Community Media Center. My name is Jim Mayola and it is Thursday, September 30, 2010, the end of September. And it is my pleasure to be interviewing my good friend, Dave Duree. Good morning, Dave. How are you today?

DAVE DUREE: Good morning, Jim. I’m fantastic, but a little damp.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes it is. It’s a little rainy today and it looks like it’ll be rainy all day. Uh, Dave you weren’t born in Carroll County. You were born and raised someplace else. Where was that?

DAVE DUREE: I was born on Halloween, uh, 1941, in Indianapolis, Indiana, just a couple months before Pearl Harbor.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding?

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. So do you remember– I mean, you were a little boy during World War II. Do you remember any of that?

DAVE DUREE: I don’t remember the war–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –as a child.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Um, my father had what they called a critical, uh, job–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and that he worked at RCA–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –and they were building radios for planes.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh, OK.

DAVE DUREE: And so they wouldn’t let him join the service,

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So he stayed at home and there wasn’t much talk about the war.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Neither was there, that I can recall around the church and the family–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –our extended family.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. So, as a little boy in Indianapolis– uh, how long did you live there?

DAVE DUREE: Well, I lived there through my high school graduation–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –year of 1959.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: So I’ve been more years in Maryland than I was where I was born.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. What was it like growing up in the, uh– I guess you were growing up in the ’40s and the early ’50s–

DAVE DUREE: Mmm.

JIM MAYOLA: What was it like?

DAVE DUREE: Well, the movie sometimes capture it pretty well, you know. I was out cruising with my friends.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: The drive-ins.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: The gals on roller skates sometimes, and they brought trays to your car–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –and everybody was talking to each other and getting out of their cars.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And while it was– I think we remember them as– fondly–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –as great times, I also remember the dark side or the drag races, where people were injured or maimed or killed–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –racing on the highways.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And that was part of the culture. This was– goodness gracious– uh, 1957, 6, 6, 7-9.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Muscle cars–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –they had more horsepower than, than the, uh, body could really deal with.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And so that was tragic, and there was quite a bit of that–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –as I recall, or at least, it struck me that way.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. So you, uh, you grew up in Indianapolis, but you got involved in music, probably at an early age, I’m gonna guess.

DAVE DUREE: I was nine years old.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: I wanted to play the saxophone–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –because I was watching performers on what little bit of TV we could get– of course, it was black-and-white–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And they usually played in a situation where the instruments gleamed and the keys glistenied–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –and the sound was golden, and I thought, I want to do that.

JIM MAYOLA: OK, so at the age of nine in the fourth grade, you got involved in instrumental music.

DAVE DUREE: Yes, and my first teacher, Mr. [INAUDIBLE]. Was a vaudevillian. He played on the vaudeville venue around–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –Indiana.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I’m not sure he was a clarinet teacher–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –or a saxophone– I mean, clarinet player or–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –saxophone player– but music is music and a lot of the, the folks could get a tune out or two.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And he owned a music store. And, uh, so I had my first lessons with him, and my first disappointment was, I was way too little for the saxophone.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh?

DAVE DUREE: My hands wouldn’t fit.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: It was too big.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So, I was too little for the clarinet.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding?

DAVE DUREE: And so they had– uh, today we see it as an E flat clarinet.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: It’s a little bitty thing.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And it only had a couple of extra keys on it.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: But I could play that.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: So I began playing the clarinet.

JIM MAYOLA: So you began on the E flat?

DAVE DUREE: Yeah.

JIM MAYOLA: So that you, at least, learned the fingering, and you learned how to, how to control the, uh, the notes and that kind of thing, so you developed your embouchure.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, not only that, I don’t think he knew the clarinet literature–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –all that much.

JIM MAYOLA: Uh-huh.

DAVE DUREE: So I was working out of violin books.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And they didn’t have the low range we do.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: They go a lot higher.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And so it forced me to do things earlier in the upper register of the instrument–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –than I would have, probably with a conventional, uh, start.

JIM MAYOLA: A happy accident?

DAVE DUREE: A lot of those in my life, I’m–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –glad to say.

JIM MAYOLA: OK, let me ask you something before we go further into your life. Um, you mentioned that you had a black-and-white television. When you were a little boy, did your family have a radio?

DAVE DUREE: Oh, yes.

JIM MAYOLA: That was before television.

DAVE DUREE: Oh, yes.

JIM MAYOLA: OK, so radio, for a lot of people, was the center, was, was the entertainment source.

DAVE DUREE: The Lone Ranger–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: The Shadow.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Fibber McGree and Molly.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: Oh my goodness, yes. I remember I used to be a great fan of The Lone Ranger.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Um, the Dark Shadow, that kind of scared me.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And so I remember that, and I’m trying to remember the actor’s name that was the Lone Ranger was Lou Broderick, I believe, who later had a TV show.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Had this big, gravelly voice.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: But he was the original Lone Ranger that I–

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding?

DAVE DUREE: –listened to on radio.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, it’s interesting because the radio used to be the center, kind of the family center of entertainment in the ’30s and the ’40s. I mean, you’d listen to everything: sports, music, uh, stories–

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: And you let your imagination make the pictures for you.

DAVE DUREE: Well, in fact, Fibber McGee and Molly is a great example, because every time he went to open that closet, you knew what was going to happen. And all the clatter, clanging, [IMITATES SOUND EFFECTS] coming out of it– I could just envision, you know, uh, pieces of things and, you know, uh, toys–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: -and, uh, tools, and who knew what that had been stuffed in there, and the door crammed shut.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And he opened it, of course, every show.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And it was– it was a wonderful moment.

JIM MAYOLA: And everybody waited for it and just cracked up.

DAVE DUREE: That’s– and we knew it was coming.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, yeah, sure. And it was wonderful, because it brought the whole family together, to listen to that.

DAVE DUREE: No.

JIM MAYOLA: No?

DAVE DUREE: No. I’ve sort of been a lone ranger–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –for most of my–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And so I would listen to it to myself–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –because I could enjoy it without distraction–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –or, or, um, interruption.

JIM MAYOLA: Did you have brothers and sisters?

DAVE DUREE: I have two sisters.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. And, did your mom work?

DAVE DUREE: No.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: That was the day of the stay-at-home mom.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah. One dad, that was making, uh, um, one wage–

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: –and supported a family of five.

DAVE DUREE: Yes, and to supplement that wage that he was making in his day– daily professional life–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –uh, my father– and I think I inherited a lot of this from him– is an original thinker–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –was an original thinker. And, uh, there’s two things that I attribute, in my life, that I learned from him without him saying a word.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And that a problem is the first opportunity for a solution, and he didn’t spend a lot a time identifying the problem–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –because he was a well on his way to a solution.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And as a result, he was a self-starter. And so, he was building ham radios.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: He was a ham radio operator. He was one of the originals.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: W9PEV were his call letters.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And they’ve gotten more complex, uh,

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –now, cuz there are so many more.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: Um, and so he built his own radios. And he built them for others.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, Heathkit had kits–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –that you could put together, and so he would put them together–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –for other ham radio operators.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, he ran across some interesting people. Uh, Beurt SerVaas, out in Indianapolis, ended up owning Life magazine.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And I remember going to Beurt SerVaas’s house to watch the Indianapolis 500 on his television-

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –cuz the screen was bigger than any of us could afford.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, sure.

DAVE DUREE: And he also owned Cory Jane April– Apron Hoops–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –which were plastic hoops that went on an apron, you could just open it up and slip it on.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And he also had hula hoops–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –later on.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And my father helped set up the machine shop to build these things.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So it was a fascinating array of experiences working with my father, helping him out as an electrician.

JIM MAYOLA: Very exciting.

DAVE DUREE: Hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: Now talk about television a little bit. When did you get your first television?

DAVE DUREE: We got our first television when I was in high school.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And the programming, of course, was very limited.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so we had the screen pattern that, when there was nothing being broadcast–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –you had the local television stations logo.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: It was a pattern–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and that’s what you’d sit there and see–

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –if you were willing to wait.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: And then there was a lot of local programming.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And in Indianapolis, you know, Indiana’s the home of basketball.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Oscar Robertson is one of my peers, um, and the Van Arsdale twins, and a bunch of folks who have made it in the pros.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And the state high school basketball tournament, back in the ’50s, was a million dollar affair.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And that’s a lot of money.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And they held the, the, the playoffs in the, uh, Butler University, um, um, basketball arena and broadcast it from there all over the state.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, I was fortunately there when the, the you know, the movie Hoosiers?

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: OK. Well, Bobby Plump at– oh goodness, I can’t think of his local high school– uh, was the main figure–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –in this real life drama.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And there school was so small, that they didn’t have a basketball gym.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: They had to go share one with the neighboring school by bus.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: And he was a pure shooter.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And they were in the final game of the playoffs, and it was one of those deals where the rules were different.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So they basically– everybody knew what was going to happen–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: He held the ball for about 10 seconds–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –with three seconds to go.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And he shot. It swished.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And they won the tournament.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow. Amazing.

DAVE DUREE: That was the true story.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: There was a little different take on it in the movie.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, sure.

DAVE DUREE: But I was there for the original.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: Yes, sir.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow, what an experience.

DAVE DUREE: Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm, amazing. So, television, when it first came out, was black-and-white.

DAVE DUREE: Right.

JIM MAYOLA: It started about 7 o’clock in the morning. It ended about 11:30 or 12 o’clock at night with the national anthem.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right.

JIM MAYOLA: And the rest of the time, it was just, you’d see a either a, uh, just a snowy screen or the, the uh–

DAVE DUREE: Test pattern.

JIM MAYOLA: The test pattern, yeah. Um, how many channels did you get?

DAVE DUREE: One.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: Yeah.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: There was only one. Indianapolis is similar in size to Baltimore–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and out in the Midwest.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Now Chicago was the, was the Action Center.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And we were a little far south for that to reach to us.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And so we only had one channel in the beginning.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Um, and I don’t recall that being a big deal.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Um, we did get all of the syndicated stuff, you know, Sky King–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, um, Roy Rogers, and Hopalong Cassidy–

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –was my favorite cowboy.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I watched a lot of that on Saturday. And the cartoons– oh my goodness.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I still thrive on those.

JIM MAYOLA: Great stuff.

DAVE DUREE: Mmm.

JIM MAYOLA: Do you remember [INAUDIBLE]?

DAVE DUREE: Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: But I was, I was more into Woody Woodpecker.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Um, he just fascinated me because that cackle of his–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –just really appealed.

JIM MAYOLA: Excellent. OK, you went to high school in, uh, Indianapolis.

DAVE DUREE: Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: And then what about college?

DAVE DUREE: Well, actually, high school is an interesting experience too.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: It was arsenal technical schools. It had a 75-acre campus.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And, um, it was an arsenal during the Civil War.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And our senior home rooms were in the arsenal building.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: We had lunch in the artillery building–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –on the first floor, and it was huge.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And then on the second floor, this was a very large school and an incredibly progressive program for today,

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –because you could take vocational courses and be– and come out equipped to practice as a professional–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –in masonry–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And they built little buildings and tore them down.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: You could learn about electricity. I took electric shop.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: We had generators and electric motors that were huge.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I remember one time, my friend Odelle White and I were– I guess kind of geeky– and we were experimenting with something. We had a generator going, a three phase generator and we took one of the phases when they had a power outage on the other floor and ran cables–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –over to the panel–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –and powered up the second floor. No

JIM MAYOLA: Kidding. Oh gosh.

DAVE DUREE: Well there was a problem. We had a solution.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow, that’s great. What an interesting experience. Now, is this– is the high school still in operation?

DAVE DUREE: Oh yes.

JIM MAYOLA: In– in the same location?

DAVE DUREE: Mm, absolutely.

JIM MAYOLA: Amazing, what a great use for an old world– uh, uh, Civil War building. I guess it’s Civil War.

DAVE DUREE: It was Civil War.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, the, the, the, one graduating class had some class clowns that went out and we had these huge cannons–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –from the era.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And they painted polka dots on ’em. And it was a big scandal on the radio–

JIM MAYOLA: Oh, I’m sure.

DAVE DUREE: and everything until they caught them.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And they were not allowed to graduate until they removed the polka dots and repainted the cannons.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: And they cannon, of course, was the, was the, uh, school newspaper’s name, was the Arsenal Cannon.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: It was really, uh, uh, an incredible place, and whenever I go back, I see new things about it. We had probably five or six buildings–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –scattered around the campus.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: The orchestra was held in the barn.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And in every music program I’ve ever been in, at every college, the oldest building on the campus is the music building.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: At McDaniel College, it’s Levine Hall.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Right.

DAVE DUREE: Over at Hood, it’s Brodbeck.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: That was there before it was Hood College.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I don’t know what there is about music, but it, it, uh, finds the old buildings.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: And we were in the barn for the orchestra.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And we were under the bleachers for the band room in the gymnasium.

JIM MAYOLA: Amazing.

DAVE DUREE: It really was an incredible place. And, of course, the ROTC fit right in.

JIM MAYOLA: Of course.

DAVE DUREE: The original barracks–

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –where they had their headquarters.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, that was perfect.

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: So what did you decide to do for college?

DAVE DUREE: Well, college was a difficult option then, because there was the draft.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, um, we hadn’t been that far out of the Korean War.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: I do remember that a lot more. I remember the comic books about the, the, the, um, fighter planes and so forth over there.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And after World War II, I became very involved with identifying World War II aircraft.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And Indianapolis, has as its center, the war memorial, uh, with the, the, uh, what was then, the monument was the tallest building in Indianapolis.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because of the shale underlying the area, the buildings couldn’t be very tall.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And I remember seeing the bombers and the, the corsair– that was my favorite plane, the hellcat–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –all those World War II planes. And then I remember reading about the updates to those with the B52 bomber coming in.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And we don’t realize how old that plane is.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And so all of that kind of was there. And then there was the draft.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so I elected to take the military, do the draft.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Or volunteer.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And I wanted to do something in music.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So, they had what they call the Kiddie Cruise in the Navy. If you joined before your 18th birthday– didn’t matter when–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –you would get out the day before you were 21.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: So I joined two weeks before I was 18.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So my first tour of duty ended the day before I was 21. A little drama went along with that. I had won a lot of awards and competitions and–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –so forth as a musician–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –in high school. And, um, my high school band director knew the director of the Navy band that was on tour through Indianapolis. I, uh, was able to get a private audition with Commander Brendler.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Another one of those fortunate strokes that you didn’t realize at the time. The day of the audition, I had food poisoning and tonsillitis. And it was not my finest hour.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah, I’m sure.

DAVE DUREE: He listened to me, and was very kind. And he says, uh, I don’t know, I think you might make it, you’re awfully young.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So go ahead and join the Navy, and you’ll be right across the school– right across the river from where we are in Washington DC, the Navy School of Music and re audition. And I thought that sounded like a plan, so I did it.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: I got out of boot camp, I went to the School of Music, and I was there for a while, about two weeks, there was a plane crash in South America– and I forget how many– I think it was 18 Navy bandsmen were killed.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh my goodness. Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I would have been on the plane probably– Oh my

JIM MAYOLA: Gosh.

DAVE DUREE: –if I had passed the first audition–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –because I was the junior– I would’ve been–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –the junior person.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: So I’m playing funerals in January–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –and thinking, oh my goodness, now what? I’m in the Navy.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And then heard about the Naval Academy Band. And there were two elite bands in the Navy, the Naval Academy Band and the Navy Band in Washington.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: When I heard about the Naval Academy Band, I found out that it was a permanent duty station.

JIM MAYOLA: Now this is in Annapolis?

DAVE DUREE: In Annapolis.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. OK.

DAVE DUREE: In fact, I’ve always been a pretty good salesperson, and as a newspaper carrier, I had won a contest–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –to take a trip to Washington, DC, and Annapolis.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So, 10 months earlier I had heard the Navy Band performing in the, uh, just outside the chapel. We used to call them squirrel concerts when we played them.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: They had a gazebo out there, and played at lunch, and there was nobody there but the squirrels–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –and a few people.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: But I heard it.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And then I recognized it.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And I thought, well, they were good.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I auditioned for that, and I made it. So in August of 1960, I was in the Naval Academy Band.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And while I was there, was when I did my college studies.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Fantastic. So you went to the Naval Academy for college–

DAVE DUREE: Which was an interesting experience, cuz now–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –remember, some of the people who were in the band were Pearl– Pearl Harbor survivors.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I didn’t know that at the time.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I didn’t find out til decades later.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: They never spoke about it.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: We had a, um, concert. We have a concert once a year of alumni, and at one of those concerts, it was the 100– it was the 75th year or whatever after Pearl– well, it couldn’t have been 75th– It was 60-something.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Anyway, whatever the year was, it was a celebration of Pearl Harbor–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –and bandsmen who had been at Pearl Harbor were recognized, and I was, oh my.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I did not know.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: They were just associates.

JIM MAYOLA: Because the were your peers.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right.

JIM MAYOLA: Amazing.

DAVE DUREE: Right. So being the young dude there, I was the same age as the midshipmen.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Which made for an interesting situation from time to time.

JIM MAYOLA: I bet. Wow, what an interesting experience for college.

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: And I bet you were having fun.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, I did.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: I guess I’ve got a bit of an ego, because I’ve never liked playing second.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I could do it and I could enjoy it, but I like playing first. And as the junior man in the clarinet section, I could see the hierarchy with 20-, 30-year people in front of me. I was never going to be, unless I stayed there.

JIM MAYOLA: That’s right.

DAVE DUREE: So I moved over to saxophone.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I sat next to an incredible sax player, Ernie Jasper.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And so sitting there and performing with him, um, was like lessons–

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –four days a week, cuz that’s how often we rehearsed.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Ironically, when he retired, he recommended me to replace him, so I became the principal saxophone player.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And that was a huge reward–

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely.

DAVE DUREE: –because I really enjoyed that instrument. There I was on my first love.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: But at the same time, I thoroughly enjoyed the clarinet.

JIM MAYOLA: Uh-huh.

DAVE DUREE: And so a number of us in the band, joined a new initiative in Annapolis. It was called the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. So I’m one of the charter members of the orchestration–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and it still exists–

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I’m very proud to say.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. And you played the clarinet–

DAVE DUREE: So I played the clarinet there.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Right.

DAVE DUREE: So I got to play principal clarinet in the symphony and principal saxophone in the Navy, and life was good.

JIM MAYOLA: I bet. And how old were you at the time?

DAVE DUREE: When I got the saxophone position, I was 19. Um, and when we started the band, the symphony, I was like 22.

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful.

DAVE DUREE: So I was in my second enlistment.

JIM MAYOLA: Amazing. Wonderful.

DAVE DUREE: And I did the Symphony for like 20 years.

JIM MAYOLA: How long did you stay in the military?

DAVE DUREE: About 10 years. I got out in 1970.

JIM MAYOLA: So it was a love. I mean, you really enjoyed it. You re-upped, and–

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: You were– were having a good time.

DAVE DUREE: But I felt like I’ve always been pursuing the completion of myself as a person.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I felt like there was more.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: That I stayed in the band to avoid going out into the real world.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because you know, it had come so quickly and so easily.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And when I got the real world– fortunately, I had the benefit of some good instruction. Uh, Doctor Hyman, when I was at Maryland, because I was doing my studies at Maryland then, and, uh, shortly after that, I did some studies with Harold Wright.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: What a blessing that was, he was at the National Symphony there.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And he’s probably one of the finest ever–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –on the instrument.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: He and Marcellus out of Cleveland–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –are considered two of, the, the giants. And, um, so, I kind of felt like I had something going.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: But what a below, I failed every audition. I was runner-up–

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding. Every time?

DAVE DUREE: Every time. And I felt, there’s a lesson here.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: What I didn’t know is, that that’s the usual course. And the people I was competing against had been taking auditions for years.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: But I just felt like there was a message being sent.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I started heading off in other directions, and I was asked to come record music for Muzak–

JIM MAYOLA: Hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –purposes by the local radio station WNAV in Annapolis.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: The sub carrier on the FM was broadcast to the Safeway stores around the state, actually–

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: –and broadcast from our studio, and then there were two other stations that were owned by the, the, the, uh, same company.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So I began doing that, and how in the world I got into it, I don’t know, but I began doing newscasts, and then became the news director. And, being in Indianapolis– I mean, in Annapolis, I was where the legislature met.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And we were using little handheld tape recorders at the time.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And so I was at press conferences, that was during the Vietnam–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –uh, intense, Vietnam public discussion.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I’m trying to think of the senator from Alaska’s name, the first one to vote against the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. He announced it on the steps there in Annapolis and I was there with my microphone.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: Actually, I felt like I really one-upped everybody, because I stuck a mike out, and he grabbed my mike .

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: Oh gosh, I wish I could remember his name. But anyway–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So there were wonderful moments.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so I could broadcast these things quickly, so two of the other stations began re-broadcasting my newscast twice a day.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And then a couple of other stations got involved, and that became the Free State Radio Network.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So, it was another opportunity.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. So Dave, where you go from there?

DAVE DUREE: Well, that was going on for a while, but there wasn’t a whole lot of money in it.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I was still playing with the symphony.

JIM MAYOLA: And a lot of work?

DAVE DUREE: Oh yes. Oh yes. Long hours.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: But a wonderful history, uh, and observation of public policy.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Um, I guess, as I was thinking about this potential interview, I was trying to think, what is it that caused this diversity. And I think my purpose in life is to make a difference.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And make a contribution. And so I’ve had the opportunity to do that as a musician and in the public arena from time to time. So during that time, I was doing news.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I was able to broadcast that was during the very intense debate over abortion. There was considerable discussion about whether or not we should have a, uh, rail system for Baltimore.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I have to share something with you about that, because we hear about media bias.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Guilty. Because we’re human.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And so I thought to myself, this needs to happen. This is a good public policy. So I chose– rather than comment on anything, I would interview the person that sounded the least thoughtful and not very well educated, who was opposed to the, uh, rail and someone who was very articulate who was in favor of it. It turned out– I’m going to leave him nameless– that the person that I selected to oppose it, was immensely popular.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh no.

DAVE DUREE: So inadvertently, I thwarted my purpose, and it was quite a lesson. So it was time to be sure that I was always in the neutral position when it–

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely.

DAVE DUREE: –came to public policy.

JIM MAYOLA: That’s an interesting story. So, where did you go from there? This is quite an adventure, Dave.

DAVE DUREE: Oh yes. So then, while I was doing the radio, um, stint, I had one of my, um, reporters interviewing a slum lord.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And even though she requested his permission and we had that on tape, and she didn’t record it on the beep line. And that’s the law.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I broadcast it.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh, Lord.

DAVE DUREE: He protested.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I got canned.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I should have. Um–

JIM MAYOLA: But that was an honest mistake.

DAVE DUREE: Doesn’t matter. It’s the law.

JIM MAYOLA: That’s the law.

DAVE DUREE: You know, if you run a light, and you don’t know the rules, it’s still the law.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So again, another lesson. I should’ve known. So, I guess the thing that I felt was, I was letting something go out that needed to go out, because they were fairly incriminating things that he was saying.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: Self-incriminating.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, and they were broadcast.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I paid the price. Uh, if I had to do it over again, I probably would not have chosen that course.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So you learn from those experiences.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I’ve learned a lot during that period, but while I was at it– I was working in covering people– I was very impressed with representative– with then- Clerk of Court, Marjorie Holt. She ran for office. Because I had gotten fired from the radio station, I was free–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –to work on the campaign and she won.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So I became her press aid.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. Wow. So one door closed and another one opened.

DAVE DUREE: It always does.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes, it does.

DAVE DUREE: And while I was there, I got a little bit too full of myself, again. And I decided, I can do this. So I ran for office–

JIM MAYOLA: OK

DAVE DUREE: –and lost.

JIM MAYOLA: Sounds like your, um, auditions.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. OK.

DAVE DUREE: Yes, and I think in the losses, not only were there lessons, but it wasn’t meant to be.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because there’s things that I do well, that don’t flourish in, in, in– with the voters.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because oftentimes, I’ll be politically incorrect–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –because I think it’s the right thing.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I realize and recognize how important it is to elected officials to keep the voter in mind, so I don’t hold that against them–

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: –when they hold back on things, because they have to by political necessity.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So, a lot of lessons.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah. So what happened next?

DAVE DUREE: Well, after I lost that race– that was in the primary–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –I was able to turn around and help Senator Cade win his seat–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: –and became his legislative aid.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: So another door opened.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: While I was doing that, uh, I had another amazing opportunity to witness– I’m a Republican lifelong–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and I’m working for all these Republicans.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I remember Senator Hall, Ed Hall, from Calvert County and Senator Bailey from– down in St. Mary’s County.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And Senator Cade And Senator Cade had been first, uh, a budget person at Westinghouse, lent to [INAUDIBLE] County, to help draft their charter.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Then he was elected to be on the First Councilmen Board. So he was a county councilman for years. Um, Then he went back to Westinghouse, I guess it was, and campaigned for Senate and won.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: He was so smart on budget figures. As a Republican, they still– the Democrats put him as a chair of one of the major fiscal committees, financial committees–

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding

DAVE DUREE: –because of his expertise. And the thing with Jack was, Senator Cade, Jack Cade–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, there was never any guessing. How in the world he got it through the voters, I don’t know. There was a guy who always told it like it was–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –and got away with it–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –because he was so thoughtful and authoritative.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: No one dared question him.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I can remember one time that I sent him a memo–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –for example, as a staff person and it came back with corrections for spelling and punctuation.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I mean, he was that detailed–

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: –and that thoughtful. And so when it came to budget figures, there was no putting anything past him.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And then his successor, later on, Bobby Neal, followed in that same pattern, and he too, as a Republican, became uh, a chair of the finance committee.

JIM MAYOLA: But he was trusted.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right.

JIM MAYOLA: Because his figures were always correct.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right. And both sides of the aisle respected them.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: I’d love to see more of that.

JIM MAYOLA: We don’t see much of that today, and it sad.

DAVE DUREE: No.

JIM MAYOLA: It sad, that we– it seems like the parties just don’t– can’t– or don’t want to get along. And that’s too bad.

DAVE DUREE: But this too shall pass.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes. Now, where were you living during this time?

DAVE DUREE: Always in Annapolis.

JIM MAYOLA: Always in– still in Annapolis.

DAVE DUREE: And quite often on the water.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And very involved with sailing. I got into sailboat racing–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and that was fabulous.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: It was great. And then, when I got through with all of that stuff, I went into the car business.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: I’d always been a car buff.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: Um.

JIM MAYOLA: Since your– since your drag racing days in the ’50s.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, well, I, yes–

JIM MAYOLA: You watched.

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm. Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And, um, I’d always had interesting cars. I had a 1950 MGA. Of the cars I’ve had, that I wish I still had, I had a two-four barrel carburetor, push-button shift Plymouth Fury– golden Fury.

JIM MAYOLA: I had one of those.

DAVE DUREE: Those cars would be a fortune today.

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful cars.

DAVE DUREE: Yeah.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I went in the car business, and, uh, immediately that worked.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I stayed in it 14 years while I continued to perform, um–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –on the side.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. So you are a natural salesperson, always.

DAVE DUREE: Communicator.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. That works.

DAVE DUREE: Because a sales person, too many times, is a manipulative person.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And they can’t get out that. What I felt I was doing best, was listening to what the customer told me, and trying to match up the product to their desires. I’ll give you an example.

JIM MAYOLA: Exactly.

DAVE DUREE: When I was in, um– at, at, at one dealership, people came in asking for specific Honda Accord with this equipment on it.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I said, OK, that’s fine, why did you pick that car?

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Well, what business– what business is that of yours? I said, I was just trying to match up what you’re wanting.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Well, they actually wanted a Volkswagen.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And we sold those.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: But they want to see if we were competitive on the Honda, cuz that’s all they shopped.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. Right.

DAVE DUREE: If anybody stopped to ask that question, they’d–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –have found out what they wanted.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So I sold them a car.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I–

JIM MAYOLA: Very interesting.

DAVE DUREE: –feel better about doing it that way–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –than than knowing all the tricks.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. And then you know that the customer walks out the door with what they really wanted, what they–

DAVE DUREE: Correct.

JIM MAYOLA: –really desired. And they’re going to be happier. They’re more likely to come back. There more likely to–

DAVE DUREE: Great referral business.

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely. Recommend you to others.

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. So you did cars for awhile.

DAVE DUREE: 14 years.

JIM MAYOLA: Still living in Annapolis?

DAVE DUREE: Uh, for a while. Then if I was asked to work at a dealership in Frederick.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And moved to Feagaville.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. Where is that?

DAVE DUREE: Feagaville is just off of 340. It’s the home of Come On Fred, which was a pace– a race horse.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: A trotter.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: Um, just the other side of Frederick City–

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: Out in the boonies.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, we had– uh, the Grange hall down there had, uh, a fundraiser every year.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And there are two things I remember– three things. You paid $1 to ride in a hay wagon on Come On Fred’s workout track.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: That was one option. The other was this really loud-mouthed lady, a young lady, who knew how to hit the buttons of all the young guys, and she was in the dunk tank.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh no.

DAVE DUREE: And she would just leer at them and you guys couldn’t hit the broadside of a barn, blah, blah, blah. And they’d be so furious. Of course, they’d throw so hard, because they really wanted to dunk her.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. And they missed.

DAVE DUREE: They missed. She knew it.

JIM MAYOLA: And they’re spending more and more dollars.

DAVE DUREE: That’s right. She was a wonderful fundraiser. And when we played bingo, we used corn, shelled corn kernels.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Wow. OK, so, what was next?

DAVE DUREE: Uh, while I was doing that, I was working at a Fiat/BMW/Subaru dealership there, and I’d always been a sales person. But you know, I’m always trying to better.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So I went to the [INAUDIBLE] Company as a salesperson, but with the understanding that I wanted to get into management.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so I moved there and did real well there. That where a flourished.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I made a ton of money.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: It was a big company. They did wonderful things. I mean, you could– you could eat on the floor in the garage.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: I was, you know, very, a German autohaus, you know–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –kinda thing. And Rudy [INAUDIBLE] was a mechanic.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so, that was his thing. And he owned the company. Actually, it was fascinating too, ’cause [INAUDIBLE] was the general manager, and we were same age.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So, I remember he said his, um, we were sitting around having a conversation one night, late. And he was talking about his uncle being shot down in France. And I had to think about that. That would’ve been the Luftwaffe.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Wow.

DAVE DUREE: So it was an amazing cultural exchange.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And you remember that plane crash I told you about.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: OK.

JIM MAYOLA: In South America.

DAVE DUREE: I was having lunch one time with the comptroller, Marge–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and ask about her background.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And she was a widow of a Navy airman.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh my gosh.

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: That’s creepy.

DAVE DUREE: Oh, it is.

JIM MAYOLA: It’s such– such a small world.

DAVE DUREE: It truly is. If you ask, it’s amazing how many connections that we can have.

JIM MAYOLA: Incredible. Wow.

DAVE DUREE: So it was wonderful, and they promoted me to management when they brought in the Saab dealership, the Saab franchise.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And then later the, uh, the Land Rover franchise.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So I started those two up, and they went very well.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So then I was moved over to the Porsche/Audi franchise, and that was my love.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And I got to drive all those neat cars–

JIM MAYOLA: Wow. Yeah. Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –as part of my job.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: But there was a downside. The hours got longer.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: The days got longer.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: We were open from nine to nine. As management, I pretty much had to be there at that time.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: Uh.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: We ended up staying past closing hours many times.

JIM MAYOLA: I’m sure.

DAVE DUREE: Then Saturdays were nine to six, then nine to nine, then they were starting on Sundays.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So I left there and I went to O’Donnell over in Ellicott City.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And meanwhile, I had– while I was making all that money– I had moved to Carroll County, to New Windsor.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. So you moved to New Windsor, about what year?

DAVE DUREE: 1984.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And bought a home that had been, uh, left to deteriorate a good period of time, and it needed renovation.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so, um, my then-wife and I moved in there. And she had a marvelous artistic eye, and we had the cash.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: So we really did a great job of restoring the house.

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful.

DAVE DUREE: And it was on tour three times.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: Oh, yes. The historical– the, uh, Heritage Committee–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –had uh, older home tours–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –that still are being done. And, uh, one time, a Sun paper reporter was there and, and, uh, did a feature story on the house.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so, it was wonderful. And I got very involved in the community. I was in the Lion’s Club.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I had quit playing. When I moved into that house and was making that kind of money in the car business, and enjoying it.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Flourishing.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: I said, you know what, it’s time to put the horns away.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I did.

JIM MAYOLA: So you stopped playing music?

DAVE DUREE: I played the final performance with the Annapolis Symphony and performed one of my signature pieces that I had performed since high school. It was the first premier rhapsody by Debussy, a Wicked piece, a beautiful piece.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I played that. When I went home, the horns were put– were put away. With the Annapolis Symphony, that was my final appearance with them.

JIM MAYOLA: And what year was that?

DAVE DUREE: 1984.

JIM MAYOLA: And you moved to New Windsor?

DAVE DUREE: Mm-hmm.

JIM MAYOLA: And you became a gentleman farmer, whatever.

DAVE DUREE: No, there were 4 and 1/2 acres.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. OK.

DAVE DUREE: I was working so hard in the car business.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And it was paying off, so, uh, that was– that was good.

JIM MAYOLA: Are you still in New Windsor?

DAVE DUREE: No. Uh, My wife and I divorced.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: She kept the house.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And I moved to Taneytown, which is where I now reside.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And it’s been fabulous.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Well, again I like these older homes.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: This home was built in 1914.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: It’s brick, has a wrap-around porch, has amazing– some of the construction of that era– you have real two by sixes.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. Oh Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Those beams.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: Then you have a sub flooring.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And then you have the decorative flooring on top of that.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: That is beautiful hardwoods–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –with gorgeous grains.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: When– with the– craftsman put in, just the window frames have the, the, um, uh, formation of the wood, centered.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: There’s a full fireplace. Again, the same thing.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: It’s just amazing, and we thoroughly enjoy it. I say we, I’m now remarried.

JIM MAYOLA: Good.

DAVE DUREE: And I have very large, new family.

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful.

DAVE DUREE: Connie, my wife, was born and raised in Littleburg, with six brothers and sisters, three of each, that all have children and many grandchildren, and when I married Connie, I inherited step-children who are grown and married–

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful

DAVE DUREE: –and have children.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: And so I now have–

JIM MAYOLA: A huge extended family.

DAVE DUREE: A wonderful family.

JIM MAYOLA: Isn’t that great?

DAVE DUREE: Yeah. Uh, her son, James, and his wife, Sandy, live here in Westminster. And Samantha and AJ are their children. And Heather lives in Lejeune, and her husband’s a career marine. And Morgan is their granddaughter– or is their daughter, my granddaughter– and that’s been a very intense situation because, um, Matt is the marine. Career marine. Drill instructor, but speaks multiple languages. He’s amazing.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: He was in Iraq and was shot the chest.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: Survived, went back, and is now deployed in Afghanistan.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And that’s what you do as a career marine.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure. Amazing.

DAVE DUREE: And, uh, he, and he’s– he does amazing things, he leaves notes behind in drawers that they, they will find over the period of time. He sent a little cuddle bear, this big marine, to his daughter with a recording of his voice.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh, that’s wonderful.

DAVE DUREE: I mean, he’s– he’s an amazing man.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Well, all of them are. James does a lot of work with, uh, IT kind of work, with media centers for homes. His wife works at T Rowe Price, as, I guess, a vice president there now. I mean, they’re thriving.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: Heather, Matt’s wife, is in social service at Lejeune. Um, everybody’s thriving.

JIM MAYOLA: Let’s back up a little bit, and go back to when you were in the car business and in New Windsor. What got you out of that? When– When did you get back into music? I’m trying to get back to that piece of it.

DAVE DUREE: Um, in ’70s, I had a student, Tim Lester, and his brother, Noll, now the chair of the Music Department at Hood–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and I performed together for a fundraiser for the Annapolis Symphony. And it was magical. We had one rehearsal, because that’s all it was. It was a last minute thing. Somebody had dropped out. We had to fill the gap, and the chemistry was great. So, fast forward 20 some years, he’s the head of the Music Department at Hood. I have decided to get out of the car business, because it was just too consuming. There was no life. Uh, And I went to WTTR as the sales manager there. And it was while I was there that [INAUDIBLE] asked me to come do a recital with him at Hood. This is was in ’92.

JIM MAYOLA: But you hadn’t played.

DAVE DUREE: That’s what I told him.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And it was a tough piece. It was, uh, Shepherd On The Rock by Schubert for piano, clarinet, and soprano. And Heather Ross was the soprano. She now directs operas in Europe, and she’s an amazing performer. Noll is too.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: He said, you can do it. I said, well, here goes. And it worked. I got back on the horse, and in about two months, I was at a level where I could deliver a, a reasonable performance, which shocked me.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. That’s amazing.

DAVE DUREE: So he asked me to start teaching there, and so it began. So in ’92, I started my real effort in teaching. Back in the ’70s, when I was teaching his brother, Tim, I had some incredible students, but um– I could tell some vignettes about some of those experiences, because when you’re a private instructor, your one-on-one with young people. And in addition to the music, a connection either occurs and they stay or it doesn’t and they leave.

JIM MAYOLA: Exactly.

DAVE DUREE: But when it does, it grows and you become extended family.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so I began again in ’92, and, uh, was teaching at Hood, and then I started teaching at Coffee Music after I walked in to buy some reeds–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –and, um, was asked if I would teach clarinet there. Clarinet and saxophone. And so then I was doing more of that.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And that was now starting to compete for my time, so I finally ended up dropping out of New Windsor Lions–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –because I needed more time for teaching.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And now, I guess at the peak of my, uh, number of students, it was close to 50.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And I currently have around 30.

JIM MAYOLA: That’s a busy schedule.

DAVE DUREE: So some of those are college students, and a majority of them are from the community.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: They call it the Prep Music Program at Hood and the Community Music Program at McDaniel.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And in ’98, I guess it was, yes, I was asked to come teach at McDaniel.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so, what goes along with that are wonderful peers, and you perform with them.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Just did a double woodwind quintet performance at both McDaniel and Hood from some of the collaborators that I have from faculty at both places.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And each of us had our own quintet, so we did a concert of each of us playing a piece, and then we came together and did a double quintet piece, which is hard to do–

JIM MAYOLA: I bet it is.

DAVE DUREE: –because it’s a lot of people–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –and there’s not a lot of money.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, we did it without a conductor, with 10 independent thinkers–

JIM MAYOLA: Oh my.

DAVE DUREE: –that know how to play chamber music and know how to collaborate.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And those kinds of things are rewarding on a level that no amount of money– that you can’t measure in money.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Very rewarding.

DAVE DUREE: And then the students. I guess I’ll start with one that you and I have shared experience with. Daniel Andrew studied with me. Oh my goodness, he was– he hates for me to say this, but too bad. I remember when he was in diapers, his mom Rachel and I were teaching at Coffee back in ’92. And years later, she asked if I would take him on as a student, as a saxophone student. And, uh, so I had Daniel as a saxophone student from age 10 through age 18. So for eight years, he was a student. And oh my.

JIM MAYOLA: He’s probably the perfect student, because he’s driven to perform his instrument. He worked very hard, and he had support of his mother who encouraged him– I want to use the word mercilessly– but she was– but it’s not like that. She just was always there to support him in his endeavor. And that’s part of the deal. If the parents aren’t supportive– and I know you run into this before– it’s awfully hard for the passion of the student to blossom.

DAVE DUREE: It’s critical.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So I’ll give you a couple– three examples. We’ll finish with the one with Daniel. Not only his mom, but his grandparents.

JIM MAYOLA: Grandparents.

DAVE DUREE: Because his grandfather was a violinist that chose between playing in the Baltimore Symphony or teaching and raising a family, and chose to raise the family.

JIM MAYOLA: Right

DAVE DUREE: And so they were all there behind him financially.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And they were– the thing that Rachel brought to the table is that Daniel just lives to pick up that horn and play. It wasn’t something that is compulsive, obsessive.

JIM MAYOLA: No, not at all.

DAVE DUREE: It just– it just flows.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: And so he would get up, and think about what he was going to do with the instrument, and to this day, that’s what he does.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: And his mom saw to it that there was a path to make that happen.

JIM MAYOLA: So he had every opportunity to succeed.

DAVE DUREE: And she an accompanist.

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely.

DAVE DUREE: Accomplished accompanist.

JIM MAYOLA: And one of the best I’ve ever worked with.

DAVE DUREE: I’ve worked with her too.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: So Daniel is at the University of Miami, and he has a full scholarship from the Stamp Family, uh, Memorial Fund that pays for a quintet of incoming freshman who are going to perform together throughout their career there in the, uh, music, in the jazz music program at Miami. And they do tours. They compose. Daniel is just thriving.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: And he will have a– he has every prospect of being a wonderful story.

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely

DAVE DUREE: Then I had another student from Italy, and his name was Tommaso Lonquinch. And Tommaso’s father was stationed at Dietrich– or not stationed, but took a job at Dietrich in research. And so he came to me as a Hood student.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: By the end, he won full scholarship to several colleges. And he had a 50% scholarship to Princeton. Um, but he selected Maryland, because all the money the family had put together for him for college–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –stayed there.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Because he was in the top program.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: We had him going to Brevard Music Center for the summers. The clarinet teacher there– and this is the network thing– knows Lauren Kitt, from the National Symphony who’s the top teacher in Maryland.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So the summer before Tomaso went to Maryland, he was prepping for the auditions. With his talent and accomplishment, he was on a level with the graduates, so he was playing in all the elite music groups there at Maryland.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: He’s now back in Europe, and his father is now teaching there. And, actually, after Connie and I got married, they invited us over to use their home for two weeks in Florence, Italy. And so we got to see, uh, Rome and Venice. It snowed in Venice while we were there.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: Oh yeah.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh my goodness.

DAVE DUREE: It was a hoot. Uh, I went to a church where, uh, the first, uh, performance of The Four Seasons by Vivaldi. And I’m thinking here I am in the composer’s home. You know, it was amazing.

JIM MAYOLA: What an experience.

DAVE DUREE: And he is doing solo work over there and doing his graduate work in Spain. His father is an accomplished pianist, and so he’s getting into the top venues there. Um, I’ve had other students like that from Carroll County, and, you know, I could go on and on about this, because I’ve got several of them going now. One of my latest, uh, that Frederick Symphony Orchestra competition. [INAUDIBLE] just won it.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: That’s a concerto competition. And each year, it’s for a group of instruments, and so my students qualify when it’s the winds and brass. And I was very delighted that in both occasions, three of the five finalists were my students.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow.

DAVE DUREE: And the winners were my students.

JIM MAYOLA: Wow. Great.

DAVE DUREE: And Griff is going to UNBC now, as an electrical engineering major–

JIM MAYOLA: OK

DAVE DUREE: –and clarinet performance minor.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: And he plans to do some composing.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: But he’s brilliant. And here is proof positive of that connection–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –between the sciences and math and music.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Absolutely.

DAVE DUREE: When we’re studying rhythm, I’m talking about it as periods of time, and how we manage it.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And that’s what counting is.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And it sounds so fundamental, but when they get into the experience, they start to make a connection between calculations and reality.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: The theoretical and the real.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: And so they’re not always these wonderful musicians, and these wonderful talents, aren’t always going to be just musicians. And I guess, in some ways, I kind of find that a reflection, because that’s sort of what I’m doing.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: Because I still have a business, as well as my teaching.

JIM MAYOLA: Right. Dave, you’ve been teaching for how long?

DAVE DUREE: Oh, let’s see. Probably 25 years accumulated with a 20-some year break. Uh, But, uh, so– so for that period of time. I started again in 1992, and I’m never going to quit again.

JIM MAYOLA: OK, so now you you’re teaching at Hood. You’re teaching at McDaniel College, you have a lot of students–

DAVE DUREE: Carroll Community College.

JIM MAYOLA: Carroll Community College. What do you see Dave Duree doing in his future? Continuing to teach, of course.

DAVE DUREE: In my life now, I have two, um, somewhat competing endeavors, but what I’ve decided is, that music is going to remain the priority. The business is wonderful, because in that case, I still feel like I’m making a difference.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because I’m doing innovative waste water systems. I’m helping planners find ways to put communities where they should be, where there isn’t water and sewer,

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: But it’ll make it work, and so they’ve got new options for planning that they didn’t have.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Homeowners that are, uh, using septic systems–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: We put out nitrogen, that just keeps on going to the groundwater or to the bay or to a drinking water.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And there is a new program to– uh, that we all pay into to fund upgrades of those systems, to help protect us. And so I’m participating in all that, but the priority for me, making a difference in both arenas, is going to remain music. And I see that as a permanent thing until I’m on my deathbed.

JIM MAYOLA: Good for you. I always conclude my interviews with two questions. But before I do that, do you have any other stories that you’d like to share?

DAVE DUREE: Oh my goodness, I could talk about stories forever.

JIM MAYOLA: Anything that you have to tell me.

DAVE DUREE: I don’t think of anything off the top of my head.

JIM MAYOLA: OK. First question it is this. What are the biggest changes that you’ve seen in Carroll County since you first moved to New Windsor in was it 1984?

DAVE DUREE: Yes.

JIM MAYOLA: Since 1984, what are the most profound changes that you’ve seen in the county?

DAVE DUREE: Well, obviously, growth. When I came here, Cranberry Mall was just starting up.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And it’s now Town Center.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: There was only one mall before that. That was Westminster Shopping Center.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Right.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, Downtown, uh, still had some of the old stores there. Mather’s was still there. It’s now Coffee Music.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: You saw– you see now that the shopping centers and the big box stores have had their impact, and then the voids that are there are being recognized in our downtown area.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So I’m seeing revitalization in Westminster, and Sykesville and, uh, some of the other towns. I think it’s coming to our town in, uh, Taneytown.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: As soon as that construction is done, we’re doing the streetscape, and it’s bee a year and a half and we have another six months to go.

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: So revitalization of the downtowns. Um, I’m seeing a different, um, a different uh makeup of the county–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: -with the agri-history, the agricultural history and the small town history of being impacted by the folks who came here to share that experience–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –but altered it at the same time. And I think that there has been a merger in that case. And many times you see it where the new folks come in and turnover and dominate it. And in this case, the people who moved here came here for what was here, and have tried to preserve that where possible.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And, you know, with our agricultural preservation program is one of the leaders the country.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: That’s amazing. So, I think, for me, the change that disappoints me, that I was hoping for, was chartered government.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Because, to me, the commissioner form of government has too many checks and not enough balances.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: And I think a structure similar to what our towns have, and what our state government has would benefit the, the county.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: That’s my personal opinion.

JIM MAYOLA: Right OK. Last question. And, um, this is a question I always ask everybody at the end of every interview. If– you’ve been around a good long while. You’ve got a lot of history, a lot of experiences, a lot of adventures. You’ve made a lot of mistakes. You’ve had a lot of successes. Um, if you were going to offer a piece of advice to a young person today, man or woman, who was getting ready to– they were finishing their education, and getting ready to start a career, or getting ready to start a family–

And in this case, I’m gonna– this is going to be a two-pronged question. I want to know what kind of advice would you have them for starting their life, but then I want you to talk a little bit about a person who was going to start a career in music. So first of all, just in general, you have advice for a young person who’s getting ready to start a career and a family.

DAVE DUREE: I think for any person, at any stage of life, the earlier you can turn in– tune in to your inner voice, the better. Because when we’re doing what we’re built to do, we do it best.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And oftentimes, we’re conflicted by pushes, by family, or culture, to be something different than we are. And when we pursue that, ultimately, it will be frustrating.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And expensive. And opportunities will be missed, so tune into your inner voice. When you find a defeat or setback, it’s not comprehensive. It’s one battle in the lifelong experience.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And you’ll lose them, but in that loss, you can also see a learning experience that hopefully will help you get more in tune with your inner voice.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Very good. Now, if a young person was planning a career in music, and they’re getting ready to graduate from high school or college, or even before that, they think that they want to grow up to be a musician. What advice would you give them?

DAVE DUREE: Music today offers a wide venue of opportunities. I’m going to start with one of the more bizarre. There’s a young man, young Jewish fellow, that grew up wanting to be a rock star.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: I never can remember his name. Um, so, he went along and learned the guitar, and learned some singing, and, and, um, went away from his faith, and went out into the world, and somewhere along the line, decided that he needed to get back to his faith. And is now a practicing Hasidic Jew.

JIM MAYOLA: OK.

DAVE DUREE: But he also fill stadiums with Hasidic Jewish rap.

JIM MAYOLA: No kidding.

DAVE DUREE: And all my kids know about him. I don’t.

JIM MAYOLA: Well, yeah. Amazing.

DAVE DUREE: Now, I don’t say that we’re all going to take that kind of bizarre–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: -turns, and see that incredible result, but there’s someone that finally got back to his inner voice.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So then I have students, that have gotten out of college, that went into radio.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, that their experience in the arts has led them to other venues. So that when they’re going to go to college and major in music, they may still find that experience qualifies them for some other direction.

JIM MAYOLA: Absolutely.

DAVE DUREE: When I have students who are preparing for college, we look ahead and find out what the audition requirements are while they’re juniors in high school. Because if you think about it, after you’ve graduated–

JIM MAYOLA: It’s too late.

DAVE DUREE: Well, it’s not– never, it’s too late, but you’ve got real steep hill to climb.

JIM MAYOLA: You’ve really got to run fast.

DAVE DUREE: You’re going to be way behind Tomasso.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Yeah. So plan ahead.

DAVE DUREE: Plan ahead.

JIM MAYOLA: How much time should a student rehearse? I know this is a crazy question.

DAVE DUREE: It’s not a crazy question. The question is, uh, how to define preparation, which is my word for practice. If you’re paying for lessons, and my students– I’ll bring this up every so often– You’re paying me $25 for this 30 minutes. You only got $5 worth, because I’ve been supervising your practice.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah

DAVE DUREE: So they need to structure practice as homework, like they would for their school subjects. And if they’re paying for lessons, and they don’t want to practice, that’s a lesson– that’s a message to themselves.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Sure

DAVE DUREE: OK, so then, I encourage them to set aside 30 minutes, for students who are developing. And set aside an initial time, a principal time, and a backup time.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Always have a backup plan, because today’s schedules are so complex–

JIM MAYOLA: Sure.

DAVE DUREE: –that the backup time may become 50 percent of your practice option. And if you don’t have that, when your original time is gone, you’ve got no place.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: So make a place. Carve out time–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –as a priority–

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: –of your planning. Then, if you’re starting to catch on, and music is meaning more to you, then practice every chance you get.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And many schools are providing study time for practice.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And the student finds themselves practicing instead of– now here you have choices. I can’t do volleyball anymore.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: I can’t do field hockey. I can’t do football.

JIM MAYOLA: Right.

DAVE DUREE: Or I’m going to do football, and I can’t do this, music.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And so those become choices–

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah.

DAVE DUREE: –and as you make those choices, you’re setting the stage for your future.

JIM MAYOLA: But again, follow your inner voice, find your passion, and follow it, and things will normally– usually work out.

DAVE DUREE: You’ll do your best.

JIM MAYOLA: Yeah. Right.

DAVE DUREE: Now, you may not be the best.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: But you’ll be your best.

JIM MAYOLA: Yes.

DAVE DUREE: And to me, from my personal life experience, I’m probably happier now than I’ve ever been. And life is more fulfilling now than it’s ever been, because I’m doing everything I wish to do.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: And then the price that I paid in terms of income, that could’ve been more or less.

JIM MAYOLA: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm.

DAVE DUREE: Uh, things that I can’t do that I would like to do, they’re worth it.

JIM MAYOLA: But your happier.

DAVE DUREE: Oh, I am.

JIM MAYOLA: Wonderful. Well, Dave. I want to thank you so very much for coming in this morning to talk to me. What a wonderful interview. It’s really been a pleasure.

DAVE DUREE: Pleasure’s been mine. I have to say though, there’s a number of subjects I would prefer to talk about besides myself.

JIM MAYOLA: Oh that’s OK. It was very good. What a wonderful adventure.

DAVE DUREE: Thank you.

JIM MAYOLA: Thanks a lot.