Dorothy Wallick

Born near Carroll County, Dorothy Wallick lived there for most of her life. After she got married, her and her husband moved to Baltimore and lived there for 38 years. Once her husband retired they moved back to Carroll County.

Transcription

DOROTHY WALLICK: I’m Dorothy Louise Rodan Wallick.

INTERVIEWER: And how did you come to be in Carroll County?

DOROTHY WALLICK: I was born near here and lived here most of my life except when I moved to Baltimore, and I was down there 38 years. And then I moved– my husband retired, and we moved back. So I’ve been there most of my life.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. So your family was here.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yes.

INTERVIEWER: And how did they come to be here?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, they move from Boring into Hampstead when it was time for me to go to school when I was about five years old.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: I was born in [AUDIO OUT]. The new high school, the new school in Hampstead opened up. And I started there and went through all my 11 grades there.

INTERVIEWER: Ohh.

DOROTHY WALLICK: They only had 11 grades then.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. What did your family do in Boring?

DOROTHY WALLICK: They were farmers.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: My grandparents were farmers [INAUDIBLE] for awhile.

INTERVIEWER: And so did they change occupation when they moved to Manchester?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: Oh, I’m sorry. Hampstead.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm. Mhm. Well, my father was a– was a huckster and– and for a couple years. Then he owned a store in Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So.

INTERVIEWER: Can you– do you remember any stories about– about that time of your life, when you were moving?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Not at that particular time of my life, later on. I met my husband when I was 14. And we were together six years.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And– and then– he was from Pennsylvania. I thought I would be living in Pennsylvania. But he got a position in Baltimore, so we went there. So I lived down there 38 years in Baltimore.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Wow. How is that different than Carroll County?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, it’s not that much difference other than– I don’t know. Carroll County’s just– you know, you’re born and raised there. And you just– your kind of heart’s there.

INTERVIEWER: Right, right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So Carr– Carroll County’s my favorite, ha, naturally.

INTERVIEWER: What was a typical day like for you growing up? Let’s say when you were in– were in grade school. Did you have a lot of chores on the farm? Or did you have a lot of responsibilities?

DOROTHY WALLICK: No, after we moved to Hampstead, we– there was no farming–

INTERVIEWER: OK.

DOROTHY WALLICK: –involved and so–

INTERVIEWER: Just mainly school?

DOROTHY WALLICK: We were on Main Street. And we were right in the center of town. The mother and father moved there. And they lived there the rest of their life.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So my mother loved it. My father loved it. My mother loved her church, her Methodist church. And–

INTERVIEWER: Was that the focal of activity? Did a lot of people do activities based around the church?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, yes. There’s always something going on that you’re working with, if you want to, you know. And there’s societies that you belong to and do– and do mission work. And–

INTERVIEWER: When you met your husband, now let’s say you were in high school?

DOROTHY WALLICK: I was 14 years old.

INTERVIEWER: Whoa.

DOROTHY WALLICK: We went together six years before we married.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: I graduated in ’31 and married in ’34. And in ’36, we moved to Baltimore.

INTERVIEWER: And what did your husband do for a living?

DOROTHY WALLICK: He was a mechanic at that time. He worked on trucks.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And–

INTERVIEWER: So you raised all your children in Baltimore?

DOROTHY WALLICK: I have two sons.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And I didn’t have them until I was 35 and 40 years old.

INTERVIEWER: Mm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So–

INTERVIEWER: How were the hospitals then down in Baltimore?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, they were– they were fine. Yes. Women’s hospital. There was a women’s hospital. That’s– I joined in. You know, it was greater Baltimore.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And so– yes. So then I brought my sons both home on Easter Sunday.

INTERVIEWER: Oh. Oh, isn’t that something?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah. It’s funny how it worked out that way.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: They’re five years apart.

INTERVIEWER: How was it then? Did people stay in the hospital a long time when they–

DOROTHY WALLICK: Of course.

[LAUGHTER]

INTERVIEWER: You got to rest a little bit?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah. Uh-huh. Yeah. I forget how long it was now, but I’m sure it was six and eight days, something like that.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Did you get help when you got home? Did– did you your family help?

DOROTHY WALLICK: My mother– my mother came down and stayed with me for a while.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm.

INTERVIEWER: So was the city living– you were in Baltimore City. Was the city living a lot different than what you had grown up with?

DOROTHY WALLICK: It was– I was living in Lochearn, which was a suburb of western– western Baltimore.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And there was a lot of young people that moved in just about our age. It was a new development. And it was very enjoyable. We had a very good– nice society there that– that we ironed out problems and had a swimming pool there. And I enjoy the time that I– we spent there, which is like 27 years.

INTERVIEWER: Wow. And so what brought you back to Carroll County?

DOROTHY WALLICK: My husband retired. And then he became later on a truck– white– motor truck salesman. He sold white trucks.

INTERVIEWER: Hmm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And then he retired. We were going back to the country, either up in Pennsylvania or Maryland. But my– my mother and father were getting elderly, so we– we found a place in Hampshire right back of my mother and father’s. So we helped take care of their garden. And my hus– my father was getting el– elderly then. And I had a big plot. We planted all kinds of vegetables.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And had a garden also, lots of flowers. And– so we– we enjoyed being back.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. What were some of the local traditions or events that were favorites of yours?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, I was always– I always liked crafts, so I belonged to the Eastern Star, and we made favors. So I had charge of making favors. And they– and we made them twice a month. And you’d save things from the kitchen, and you’d make things out of nothing, you know, that some people would throw away.

INTERVIEWER: Hmm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So I enjoyed that. And I belong to the Women’s Club of Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And then– then also they– the women’s– the Women’s Society of the St. John’s Methodist Church.

INTERVIEWER: Mm. Mhm. And do you still participate in any of those?

DOROTHY WALLICK: No, I haven’t– I’ve only been there once since I left, I guess. Because most of the ones that I was going to church with are not there anymore. They’re either somewhere else or have passed on.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And so I was over just a couple weeks ago. My– my son asked me if I wanted to– to go over. He– well, he– he didn’t ask me. He said, I’ll take you over to your church. And then we’ll go down to the harbor and have dinner.

And I said, oh, Bruce, I don’t know anybody over there hardly anymore. I feel like a stranger.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But then of course I thought it over, and I thought, that might be my last time to get over there. So I decided to go. And of course there’s still a few things. But my closest friends were– were not there.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But a lot of other friends were there, and they come up to greet me. And– and it was very enjoyable.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So I don’t participate in anything over there anymore. I gave up my car four years ago, so I’m not driving now.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So– and I’m– I’m– they take a lot of trips over at Carroll Lutheran Village. And– but I’ve been there and did that.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And– and I’m satisfied to stay home, plus I have incontinence trouble. And so I have to be aware of that.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So I’m satisfied to take it easy now.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm What–

DOROTHY WALLICK: At 95, I think I’m privileged to.

INTERVIEWER: [LAUGHS] That’s right. You can do anything, right? Take it easy.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm. And I’m always doing something in crafts– they have craft class over there. And I always attend the craft classes and the exercise. I do the exercises.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: We play cards, and– I don’t know if you know all the things that goes on around here or not.

INTERVIEWER: I know that it’s a very active facility.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And you can keep busy, and the everybody, even people who don’t do very much at a time, it goes fast for them.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because people think when you move in here, what do you do with your time, you know? Well, there’s plenty to do if you want to do it, you know?

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And I can’t walk, but I can– I can do all kinds of exercises.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because I had a replaced hip 10 years ago.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So my hip gets tired when I walk a distance. So.

INTERVIEWER: Were there any other memories of where you grew up that– that you can think of as the story, maybe about the shopkeepers or anything unusual that was going on?

DOROTHY WALLICK: We had the– we had stores there that were in Hampstead for years. They had Hyson’s Furniture Store, Elner’s, a hardware store. They were all there. And town [INAUDIBLE] store, you’d go in there and get penny candy. [LAUGHS] It was right across from the high school. And I– I only had a block to walk to go to my school.

INTERVIEWER: Well, that was good.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So I could come home for lunch.

INTERVIEWER: Did most kids do that? Did they go home for lunch or did they bring–

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, the ones that lived right in town, you know. It was within walking distance. Of course, they had buses that go from out in the rural sections.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Mhm. What kind of games did kids play then?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Volleyball, dodgeball.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Did they have sports in school?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh yes. Oh yes. Boys had soccer.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Didn’t have football then. They had soccer.

INTERVIEWER: Hmm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm. So, you know, it– I got involved, you know, in everything I could.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Stayed busy. Did you have brothers and sisters?

DOROTHY WALLICK: I had one brother.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah.

INTERVIEWER: Was he at school with you?

DOROTHY WALLICK: He was seven years younger than me.

INTERVIEWER: Oh, OK. So that was probably a good thing, right?

[LAUGHTER]

DOROTHY WALLICK: Had a little trouble with him. In the first grade, he didn’t want to go to school. And the teacher wasn’t very kind to him. And I had to take him back to his room a couple times.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: He turned out real well anyhow.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Good.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So. He’s seven years younger than me, and he’s gone, and I’m still here.

INTERVIEWER: Oh, wow.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah, he had a very bad accident with a remotest– with a lawnmower. He fell off of it and broke his neck and it paralyzed him.

INTERVIEWER: Oh, goodness.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So that was very sad.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah, very sad. Sorry.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah. My mother lived to be 94.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And then she just took a deep breath one day, and that was it.

INTERVIEWER: Hmm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So I hope I can do the same thing.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Are they all up at Manchester?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: I’m sorry, I keep saying that. They’re right next to each other.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah, but they’re–

INTERVIEWER: Different, different, of course.

DOROTHY WALLICK: They’re foes to us when we were playing school games.

[LAUGHTER]

INTERVIEWER: Are they at a cemetery up there, local? Your mom and your– and your brother?

DOROTHY WALLICK: They’re in Hampstead in a cemetery right back of St. John’s Church.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. [AUDIO OUT] [INAUDIBLE]. How would you describe it to them?

DOROTHY WALLICK: It’s a very nice county. It was nice when I was growing up. Now it’s changed a bit, same with the times, you know. And– but I– I like it.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And I thought it was a great place to live. Naturally if you’re there all your life, you know.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: You know. We had– we had our house– Mother’s house– Daddy’s house was on Main Street. And we were right in the middle of town, practically. And we had a big, long porch, you know, across the– clear across the–

INTERVIEWER: Ohh.

DOROTHY WALLICK: –house. I lived on that porch.

[LAUGHTER]

INTERVIEWER: Yeah. It’s nice to be out, isn’t it?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah. It gives you a total ‘nother space to be in.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah.

INTERVIEWER: Now, you saw Baltimore change a little bit too, because you talked about going down to the harbor recently.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm.

INTERVIEWER: How– how has that changed?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh my. That’s why my son took me down there, because it’s changed so from when I was down there last.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: It wasn’t built up. Now it’s all these condos, you know. It’s surrounded. And he drove all around there for– for 10 or 15 minutes, just to show me the difference, you know.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. How do you remember it being?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, well, you mean years ago?

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, I never got down to the harbor. That was a place you didn’t go to. I mean, you know, that wasn’t a nice place then. You– you didn’t go down to the– the harbor. It was only boats pulled in there, you know. And– so–

INTERVIEWER: It’s more like a– a dock and–

DOROTHY WALLICK: See, it’s changed now. Every– all things downtown are not what they used to be. I keep– Bruce said, I– we went down to this restaurant downtown. I said, Bruce, downtown? You know– you know– downtown now we thought had turned, you know, not in a very good neighborhood.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But it has changed and all– have these condos. They’re expensive. Some of them are a million dollars.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: They’re quite expensive. It’s very nice. They’re everywhere you see. So it’s a– it’s changed.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: It’s progress.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And then there’s nice hotels down there. And they– at the restaurant, we went to the Rusty Scupper. And I– they got me a seat. They asked for a seat right by the window so I could see the– the boats go up and down, you know?

INTERVIEWER: Yeah. It’s pretty there, isn’t it?

DOROTHY WALLICK: So, it was really, really nice.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Now you talked about your dad’s work. What did your mom do?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Nothing. [LAUGHS]

INTERVIEWER: I bet she did a couple things.

DOROTHY WALLICK: No, my–

INTERVIEWER: She worked at home–

DOROTHY WALLICK: My grandmother my grandmother was very talented. She did everything.

INTERVIEWER: Oh, really?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, she sewed, and she made a duplicate house so there’s farmhouse that they had– that they had designed. And was lace curtains in the door– old doorknobs, and every detail, and it was marvelous. And we used to have it in our Christmas garden. And she would come up and– and trim our– our– fix our garden for us.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And she made wedding cakes. And she sold them. And my– my cousin has a book of all the wedding cakes that she made. Mine was the last one. And she couldn’t do the– the fancy work on it like the top and then with leaves, you know.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: She used to do those herself.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But now– but for mine, she had to buy them. And she– there was just nothing she couldn’t do, you know?

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But she didn’t teach my mother anything.

INTERVIEWER: Ah.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But she made all of her clothes and a lot of my clothes.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: She was very– very talented.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Did your mom cook at all?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh yeah. She cooked, sure. Yeah. She was a good cook.

INTERVIEWER: Any special recipes you remember?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah, prunella cakes that nobody’s heard of. [LAUGHS]

INTERVIEWER: What was different about it? What was it?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, you put prunes in it. And you use the prune juice for your icing.

INTERVIEWER: Ohh.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And– it’s very– it’s very moist. And–

INTERVIEWER: I bet it’s rich.

DOROTHY WALLICK: It was my husband’s favorite cake also.

INTERVIEWER: Mm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because it was nice and moist and all.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And–

INTERVIEWER: Did you ever make it?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Oh, yes because it was his favorite cake, so I made it often.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And I put it in our church book, you know.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah, you have to get that recipe. [LAUGHS]

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because the church made a recipe book and composed it. And I put that in as one of mine. So– but it was a nice– it was the same as a spiced cake. It was spiced.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. So at Christmas that was– you had special traditional things that you did? You said you had a garden?

DOROTHY WALLICK: We had a tree and a garden, you know, always. Mhm. And then of course the house sit the corner, and then they had a little bar over here that she’d make the paths you know. And I– then for the salt– I guess it was salt that she made the paths out of. And– so–

INTERVIEWER: That was neat.

DOROTHY WALLICK: I’d take my brother, take a walk downtown while she was doing it in the afternoon, you know, to get him out of the way.

[LAUGHTER]

So.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah. Well, it sounds like you enjoyed your childhood–

DOROTHY WALLICK: My mother put a lot of dinners on, you know. She’d put a lot of big dinners on. And– and– it was– we always– one of the family would take each one of the holidays. My mother would take that one. Her sister would take another one and my grandmother. And– and then– I of course got into it. And then after my grandmother died, and I– I used to have Thanksgiving dinner.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And put on some big dinners too.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. So then they traveled down to Baltimore for that?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Or we traveled up to Hampstead when they had it.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: So.

INTERVIEWER: Are yours kids still in the area?

DOROTHY WALLICK: One lives in Phoenix, and the other one’s in Parkton. So they’re not far away.

INTERVIEWER: Good.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But over the weekend, they’ve been– they’ve been out of town, so they’re getting– one got back yesterday from Kansas. And the other one’s getting back from San Francisco. And they were eating dinner out there, Friday night. And then the manager– somehow they got in the conversation about Hampstead. And this man was a relative of a– of a very dear friend of mine in Hampstead. So I mean, you can’t get away from yourself, you know?

INTERVIEWER: LAUGHS]

DOROTHY WALLICK: And he thought it was really, you know, really something.

INTERVIEWER: Small world.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because Ruth Joyner was a very good friend. And of course, she’s passed away now. But it was a relative of hers. And– and he was asking her all about Dean’s and some of those places in Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And they had quite a conversation.

INTERVIEWER: What was Dean’s?

DOROTHY WALLICK: A restaurant.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm. Is that still there?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yes, mhm. It’s been there for a long time.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah. The only really– really good restaurant in– in Hampstead. The others are all fast food, came in later on.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: But at one time, that was the only place to eat.

INTERVIEWER: Right. Hmm.

Tell me a little bit about that– you were telling me that Hampstead–

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yes.

INTERVIEWER: –was named something else originally.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Spring– Spring Garden.

INTERVIEWER: And how did it come to be Hampstead?

DOROTHY WALLICK: Because it was named from a Hampstead in England, from where they came from. It was two brothers came over together. One was a brother. I think one was a brother-in-law and a brother. And–

INTERVIEWER: And they renamed it.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yes.

INTERVIEWER: Uh-huh.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Yeah. Yeah. They– I made a note here. I used to know everybody in Hampstead, you know, when it was only 960 people. Now it’s 4,500 people–

INTERVIEWER: Wow.

DOROTHY WALLICK: –living in Hampstead.

INTERVIEWER: Wow.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And when I see the [INAUDIBLE], well, I don’t know them, you know, anymore. But it used to be, you know, you knew everybody.

INTERVIEWER: Right.

DOROTHY WALLICK: You know.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Uh-huh. But that’s way back, you know. I go way back.

[LAUGHTER]

Living in the Village, I graduated with 20 people, 20 people in my graduating class.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: And four of us lived at the Carroll Lutheran Village at one time. Two of the– two of the girls have gone. And two of us are still there.

INTERVIEWER: Oh.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Jane Willis. She mentioned–

INTERVIEWER: Oh yeah.

DOROTHY WALLICK: –she had an interview with Jane Twig Willis.

INTERVIEWER: Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm. Do you know her?

INTERVIEWER: Not personally. No. Mhm.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Well, she’s the other one.

INTERVIEWER: And it just so happens that you were here. You hadn’t kept in touch?

DOROTHY WALLICK: No, no, no. It’s just happened that we– I thought it was– I thought it was interesting that the four– four of my graduating class and only 20 of us that we, you know, settled here.

INTERVIEWER: Yeah. That’s interesting.

DOROTHY WALLICK: Mhm. So.

INTERVIEWER: Well, thank you so much for sharing your memories about that time.